Skip to content


Pediatric Rheumatology

Open Access

Single nucleotide polymorphism of NLRP3 (Q705K) In juvenile spondyloarthritis and oligo/ polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

  • Marija Perica1,
  • Mandica Vidovic1,
  • Lovro Lamot1, 2,
  • Lana Tambic Bukovac1,
  • Sanja Kapitanović3 and
  • Miroslav Harjaček1
Pediatric Rheumatology201412(Suppl 1):P31

Published: 17 September 2014


Juvenile Idiopathic ArthritisInnate Immune SystemWild Type AlleleNLRP3 InflammasomeJuvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patient


The NLRP3 inflammasome is a key component of the innate immune system serving as an intracellular sensor of microbial components and cell injury. Gain-of-function mutations of the NLRP3 gene, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) Q705K, lead to autoproteolytic activation of caspase 1, resulting in excessive and uncontrolled production of proinflammatory cytokines. This may represent the mechanism by which an inflammatory loop is triggered leading to a long-term inflammatory phenotype.


Our objective was to compare the frequency of SNP Q705K of NLRP3 among patients with juvenile spondyloarthritis (jSpA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).


DNA was extracted from blood samples of 37 jSpA patients and patients with oligoarticular or polyarticular JIA, diagnosed according to ILAR criteria. Polymorphism of the NLRP3 (Q705K) was determined using real time and multiplex PCR.


Among 37 genotyped patients, 24 patients with jSpA (92.31%) and 9 patients (81.82%) with JIA were carriers of the wild type allele. Only 2 patients in each group were heterozygous for NLRP3 (Q705K) polymorphism (7.69% in jSpA and 18.18% in JIA group). Although the observed frequency among groups was not statistically significant (Pearson Chi-square 0.8820724, p=0.64337), the frequency of allele polymorphism observed among our study population was higher (10.81%) than previously described in the general population (6.5%).


The frequency of SNP Q705K of the NLRP3 gene did not differ among jSpA and JIA patients. There was also no evidence that variant of NLRP3 is a major risk factor for jSpA or JIA, however, lack of susceptibility should be confirmed in a larger group of patients.

Disclosure of interest

None declared.

Authors’ Affiliations

Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology, Children's Hospital Srebrnjak, Croatia
University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia
The Ruđer Bošković Institute, Zagreb, Croatia


© Perica et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.