Skip to content


Pediatric Rheumatology

Open Access

P01-029 – Microscopic hematuria in FMF

  • L Grabowitz1, 2,
  • OL Kukuy3,
  • M Lidar1, 2, 4,
  • I Ben Zvi2, 4,
  • O Feld2, 4,
  • Y Kesel4 and
  • A Livneh1, 2, 4
Pediatric Rheumatology201311(Suppl 1):A33

Published: 8 November 2013


VasculitisSeverity ScoreClinic VisitPurpuraPhase Reactant


Hematuria is a recognized feature of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), but its prevalence and clinical, genetic and demographic correlates are not known.


To study the rate and features of microscopic hematuria in FMF.


We studied consecutive FMF patients, who came for a pre-scheduled follow up visit in the FMF clinic for the presence of microscopic hematuria, defined as ≥5 RBC/HPF or ≥25RBC/µl in urine analysis performed during remission, recorded at least once in the 3 previous clinic visits. Exclusions were known kidney, urinary tract, prostate or gynecologic diseases, bleeding or thrombotic diatheses, pregnancy or menstruation, intensive physical activity and anticoagulant/platelet treatments. Patients presenting with hematuria were compared to patients without hematuria for various clinical, genetic and demographic parameters, using a questionnaire, patient files, and an interview.


The frequency of microscopic hematuria among FMF patients was found to be 17% (30/173), not conspicuously higher than in the general population (1-16%). Hematuria was associated with higher levels of acute phase reactants during the attack-free phase, and higher rates of a history of vasculitides: protracted febrile myalgia and Henoch Schonlein Purpura. There were no differences in the distribution of severity scores among patients of the hematuria and control groups. The rate of homozygosity to M694V and the rate of 2 affected MEFV alleles was similar to that of the control group.


This study could not confirm the notion that microscopic hematuria is more common in FMF. However, its occurrence may reflect an active disease and renal vascular inflammation

Disclosure of interest

None declared.

Authors’ Affiliations

Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Heller Institute of Medical Research, Israel
Institute of Nephrology and Hypertension, Sheba Medical Center Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel
Medicine F, Sheba Medical Center Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel


© Grabowitz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.