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Table 1 Factors rated important in physician decisions regarding withdrawal of medications in inactive disease for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (top 5 listed very important are bolded)

From: Physician practices for withdrawal of medications in inactive systemic juvenile arthritis, Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) survey

Factor (N = 73) Very Important
n (%)
Moderately Important
n (%)
Somewhat
Important
n (%)
Less
Important
n (%)
Un- important
n (%)
Patient/family preference 15 (21) 29 (40) 22 (30) 7 (9) 0
aToxicity/side effects/tolerance of medications 48 (65) 21 (28) 5 (7) 0 0
Poor adherence to medications 14 (19) 34 (47) 19 (26) 6 (8) 0
Younger age at diagnosis 3 (4) 8 (11) 23 (32) 31 (42) 8 (11)
bDuration of disease 8 (12) 35 (49) 13 (18) 13 (18) 2 (3)
Time maintained in inactive disease 38 (52) 29 (40) 5 (7) 1 (1) 0
cAmount of time to achieve inactive disease 24 (32) 36 (49) 12 (16) 2 (3) 0
cTotal number of DMARDs/ biologics used since diagnosis 19 (26) 29 (38) 13 (18) 11 (15) 2 (3)
Presence of JIA associated damage (joint or growth) 15 (21) 40 (56) 12 (16) 4 (6) 2 (3)
History of MAS 36 (50) 27 (37) 8 (11) 1 (1) 1 (1)
dHistory of previous cardiac or pulmonary involvement 29 (41) 24 (33) 15 (21) 3 (4) 1 (1)
History of previous ICU admission 20 (27) 34 (47) 14 (19) 3 (4) 2 (3)
Number of previous flares 33 (45) 25 (34) 13 (18) 2 (3) 0
dPast failure of medication taper 47 (65) 20 (28) 5 (7) 0 0
Anticipated social or environmental changes 1 (1) 30 (42) 27 (37) 14 (19) 1 (1)
  1. Abbreviations: N = Total number of responses for the specific factor
  2. a N = 74, b N = 71, c N = 74 d N = 72
  3. Other factors that physicians listed included: making plans for parenthood or discovery of pregnancy with intention to maintain pregnancy, new diagnoses, monitoring ESR/CRP/ferritin, financial considerations including coverage and amount of out-of-pocket payments, access to care, and season