Skip to main content

Table 4 Transition practices

From: Challenges in transitioning adolescents and young adults with rheumatologic diseases to adult Care in a Developing Country - the Brazilian experience

  Answers N (%)
Who is primarily responsible for the transition process? The patient himself. 30 (39.5)
The family of the patient. 16 (21.1)
The pediatric rheumatology center. 67 (88.2)
The adult rheumatology center that will receive the patient. 26 (34.2)
  Answers N (%)
On a scale from 0 to 5, how important it is that the patient schedule their own appointments? 0 5 (6.6)
1 3 (4.0)
2 11 (14.5)
3 9 (11.8)
4 12 (15.8)
5 36 (47.3)
  Answers N (%)
What resources do you find useful to facilitate transition? Educational pamphlets targeted to the patient (printed). Very useful: 36 (47.4)
A bit useful: 39 (51.3)
Useless: 1 (1,3)
Educational pamphlets targeted to the patient (online). Very useful: 29 (38.1)
A bit: 43 (56.6)
Useless: 4 (5.3)
Educational group sessions regarding the transition process. Very useful: 53 (69.8)
A bit useful: 21 (27.6)
Useless: 2 (2.6)
Discuss the transition process during medical visits. Very useful: 72 (97.3)
A bit useful: 2 (2.7)
Useless: 0
No answer: 2
Questionnaires to assess patients’ knowledge about transition. Very useful: 39 (51.3)
A bit useful: 33 (43.4)
Useless: 4 (5.3)
Use of direct forms of communication to educate and answer questions: phone calls, emails, text messages, whatsapp, etc. Very useful: 41 (53.9)
A bit useful: 31 (40.8)
Useless: 4 (5.3)
Use social media to educate and answer questions: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, others. Very useful: 38 (50.7)
A bit useful: 29 (38.7)
Useless: 8 (10.7)
No reply: 1
Printed copy of the medical records. Very useful: 31 (41.3)
A bit useful: 40 (53.3)
Useless: 4 (5.3)
No reply: 1
Online version of the medical records. Very useful: 40 (53.3)
A bit useful: 27 (36.0)
Useless: 8 (10.7)
No reply: 1